Multiple Strikes

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A multiple strike is when a coin is struck but fails to be ejected from the coining chamber and is struck again, sometimes the coin rotates from falling back into the coin chamber, other times more coins enter the chamber and are struck and bonded together; these are called bonded-mated pairings.

 

Very difficult to place a value on these since the more dramatic the more value and then when they become bonded that’s another level of value. If you do find one they’re worth around the $1,000 range but some have traded for less is they’re common or not dramatic enough.

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Capped Die

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Capped die happens when a coin sticks to the hammer die and if it remains on the die long enough it will spread around the outside of the die, forming what looks like a bottle cap. There’s different stages of capped dies and there’s struck through capped dies as well. 


Die caps could almost be called the “King” of mint errors since they’re highly sought after and trade for a higher premium on average then most mint errors. A nicely formed and deep “bottle cap” often sell for as much as $30,000 but most are in the $2,000 to $3,000 range with some examples trading for a little less.
Also see Strike Through

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Dropped Letter

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Dropped letter happens when a die’s letter cavity is compacted with grease and debris and is eventually jarred loose, falling onto the planchet and then is struck into the surface of the coin. The struck through a dropped letter will create and incuse of the letter and it must be the same size and font style found on the coin is struck into.

The dropped letter error in the image above was graded by PCGS MS65 RD and it sold for $161 but a Morgan Dollar with an O dropped letter sold for $8,518.75. So there’s a wide range of values on these and I would be cautious on buying raw examples since many collectors seem to see numbers out of any shape and declare them mint errors.

Also see strike through

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Images courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Strike Through

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Struck through cloth

Struck Through Grease

Struck Through Die Cap

A coin is considered struck through when an object or substance gets in between the die and the planchet and the planchet is struck by the die. Coins have been struck through wood, nails, paper clips, staples, grease, other coins, planchets and unidentified objects. Often coins struck through a grease filled die will be missing some design features.

A coin can also be struck through a die cap and there’s different stages and error types for that and this area has many anomalies considering the nature of the coining chamber all that can happen at the rate of speed of the press.

Values depend on many factors which include the coin type, denomination, and what the coin is struck through. Struck through a die caps can be worth well over $2,000 and they’re one of the most valuable strike trough errors, with struck through grease on a cent is worth around $100 to $200. However, struck through grease on a cent must effect the entire face of the coin to hold that value and not just result in partly missing features like a digit or letter.

Further note: Don’t confuse struck through grease with a filed off or polished off design feature like the three leg buffalo nickel, they’re not the same but result in a similar appearance. In your search you will find many cents with something missing and these are too common to be worth anything extra.

Also see Capped Die , Uniface Strike

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Sintered Planchet


Sintered planchets or plating is now known as improper annealing because it is thought that during the annealing process pure metal molecules, as in copper, migrate to the surface of the coin and form layers. Add to this some heat and oxygen and coins can become reddish, black, and spotted from oxidization of the purer metal.
Also See Improperly Annealing
Modern improperly annealed planchets are worth $35 to $120 but early dates and denominations like an Eisenhower Dollar can be worth $400. Value depends on the grade of the coin as well and alloy.

Improperly Annealed Planchet





Improper annealing or plating used to be called Sintered planchets or plating. It is thought that during the annealing process pure metal molecules, as in copper, migrate to the surface of the coin and form layers. Add to this some heat and oxygen and coins can become reddish, black, and spotted from oxidization of the purer metal.
Also See Sintered Planchet
Modern improperly annealed planchets are worth $35 to $120 but early dates and denominations like an Eisenhower Dollar can be worth $400. Value depends on the grade of the coin as well and alloy.




Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Missing Clad Layer


Most modern half dollars, quarters and dimes as well as Eisenhower Dollars are clad in nickel with a copper core and there’s been instances of one side of the coil stock missing the nickel clad layer, exposing the copper core. If the planchets are punched out and make it through the entire minting process then this allows for missing clad layer coins.

It is almost always only one side of coin and usually the coin displays some weaker striking characteristics due to the planchet being thinner than normal.

Values depend on the condition of the coin and the grade assigned by a grading company. It can also depend on the date and mint of the coin since some coins are low mintage key dates. The values listed below sample known final values of sold coins and then that is averaged, so I listed a start and a possible high, but often this had to be estimated based on the research.

Partial cladding missing will trade at a reduced rate and double sided would increase.

Roosevelt Dime: $45-$130

Washington Quarter: $84-$105

Satin Finish Quarter: $400+

Kennedy Half Dollar: $250-$300

Eisenhower Dollar: $450-$1,000

Susan B. Anthony Dollar: $150

Sacagawea Dollar: $500-$920

Presidential Dollar: $260 and up

Also see Plating Issues


Image courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Incorrect Planchet





An incorrect planchet is a die of a certain type and/or denomination that strikes a planchet not intended for that type and denomination. It can be a nickel struck on a dime planchet or a half dollar struck on a quarter planchet, or any other combination. You can identify an incorrect planchet by weight and by site if the intended design is larger or smaller than the planchet it is struck on.

Incorrect or wrong planchet errors can be worth $400 for a cent struck on a dime planchet to $18,000 for a 1983 Cent struck on a 95% copper planchet (supposed to be copper plated zinc planchet in 1983). Value will depend on rarity, coin type and denomination as well as which planchet alloy the coin is struck on.

Images courtesy of Heritage Auctions




Blank Planchet


An unstruck blank is a round clipped piece of alloy that has not been through the upsetting mill and does not have an edge. A blank planchet is unstruck but has an upset edge.

Values for blanks and blank planchets vary but unless they’re the larger coins and higher denominations like dollars then they’re not worth much. Modern cent blanks are almost valueless with a few selling for a premium but not more than the grading fee that it cost to encapsulate the coin.


Plating Issues



Lincoln Cents have been zinc planchets plated in copper since 1982 and this process took a while to perfect. In the meantime the plating didn’t often completely adhere to the zinc planchet and the air in these areas would expand and create bubbles of all shapes and sizes. You can actually poke and burst these shapes and bubbles. 
Once these pockets are breached it doesn’t take long for the zinc oxide to form and eventually zinc “rot to occur. 
These plating pockets don’t add any value to the coin.
Plating bubbles in and shape don’t add any value to a coin, but I have seen collectors pay a premium for them because the coin was misrepresented as something else or the collector thought it was something it is not. However, an extreme example of plating bubbling might go for a few dollars on occasion.